Continued… DWDM Part VIII

As mentioned in last post,  today I’ll share again on the “highway analogy” but using different diagram, which I believe is more appealing for clearer understanding on TDM-DWDM relationship.

Consider a highway analogy where one fiber can be thought of as a multilane highway. Traditional TDM systems use a single lane of this highway and increase capacity by moving faster on this single lane. In optical networking, utilizing DWDM is analogous to accessing the unused lanes on the highway (increasing the number of wavelengths on the embedded fiber base) to gain access to an incredible amount of untapped capacity in the fiber. An additional benefit of optical networking is that the highway is blind to the type of traffic that travels on it. Consequently, the vehicles on the highway can carry ATM packets, SONET, and IP.

By beginning with DWDM, service providers can establish a grow-as-you-go infrastructure, which allows them to add current and next-generation TDM systems for virtually endless capacity expansion as shown in the following diagram that illustrates the capacity expansion potential of DWDM.

Capacity Expansion Evolution

Capacity Expansion Evolution

DWDM also gives service providers the flexibility to expand capacity in any portion of their networks – an advantage no other technology can offer. Carriers can address specific problem areas that are congested because of high capacity demands. This is especially helpful where multiple rings intersect between two nodes, resulting in fiber exhaust.

Service providers searching for new and creative ways to generate revenue while fully meeting the varying needs of their customers can benefit from a DWDM infrastructure as well. By partitioning and maintaining different dedicated wavelengths for different customers, for example, service providers can lease individual wavelengths-as opposed to an entire fiber-to their high-use business customers.

Compared with repeater-based applications, a DWDM infrastructure also increases the distances between network elements-a huge benefit for long-distance service providers looking to reduce their initial network investments significantly. The fiber-optic amplifier component of the DWDM system enables a service provider to save costs by taking in and amplifying optical signals without converting them to electrical signals. Moreover, DWDM allows service providers to do it on a broad range of wavelengths in the 1.55-µm region. For example, with a DWDM system multiplexing up to 16 wavelengths on a single fiber, carriers can decrease the number of amplifiers by a factor of 16 at each regenerator site. Using fewer regenerators in long-distance networks results in fewer interruptions and improved efficiency.

Source: Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) by The International Engineering Consortium (IEC)

To be continued… DWDM Part IX

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